Bill Casey

Your member of parliament for


Cumberland-Colchester

Bill Casey

Your member of parliament for


Cumberland-Colchester

Menu

Beaubassin

Beaubassin was an Acadian village settled in the late 18th century. It was a thriving and peaceful community. But in 1750, the village was evacuated and burnt by the French, and the population resettled at what would become Fort Beausejour, to avoid imminent conflict with English forces. The Acadian expulsion began to unfold as English troops marched from Fort Lawrence along the Fundy coast, sacking Acadian settlements along the way and dispersing their inhabitants. They crossed over Cobequid Mountain Range and went into Wallace, where the village was burnt to the ground, and carried on to Tatamagouche. The English rounded up the women and children and sent them back to Fort Beausejour, while the men were dispersed.

In this way, the destruction of Beaubassin signaled the oncoming tragedy of the Acadian Expulsion which culminated in the deportation of Acadians to the American South and France, in 1755.

In 2000, aerial photographs revealed the location of Beaubassin, lost for 250 years. It was then that archaeological work could proceed in earnest, and in 2005, with the help of M.P. Bill Casey and the intervention of P.M. Jean Chretien, Parks Canada designated the area a National Historic Site.

Parks Canada has been working to develop the site of Beaubassin to its full potential so that Maritimers and visitors can better understand the important place of the Acadians in our history. The interpretive site is scheduled to open this summer as a part of the area’s Canada 150 events.

Learn more about Beaubassin